Kate Briscoe

‘As an artist I have always viewed landscapes in terms of structure, form and textures, from a geological perspective.

I grew up on the South Coast of England; my first landscapes were of the coastal cliffs and rock formations along that coast and on The Isle of Wight.

Here in Australia I have found extraordinary and exciting places where the Earth’s structure is weathered, worn and exposed. I have worked from Frazer Island, The Glasshouse Mountains, Arnhem Land, and the South Coast of NSW, the Snowy Mountains and lately from the Kimberley in WA.

The massive river gorges and coastal cliffs of The Kimberley demonstrate a long geological history, and give an abundance of visual information in terms of colour, structure and texture. Strata, rifts, splits and faults are the forms I use, colour and texture are essential elements. Recent works reference Emma Gorge in the Kimberley, where rocks of different geological eras and appearance are juxtaposed as they have fallen into the gorge.’

Sydney-based artist Kate Briscoe has an extensive exhibition CV, exhibiting throughout Australia as well as exhibitions in Korea, Beijing, the UK and the US. She obtained her initial tertiary qualifications in the UK before migrating to teach at the National Art School and complete her Masters of Fine Art at COFA. Briscoe has been a finalist in the Blake, The Fleurieu Prize for Landscape, The Plein Air Prize and the Wynne Prize on various occasions.

Her work is included in major public collections including the Newcastle Regional Art Gallery, NSW Government House, and Parliament House Canberra. Respected art writers and critics including Joanna Mendellsohn, Peter Pinson and Sasha Grishin have reviewed Briscoe’s practice. She has held over forty-five solo exhibitions.

Briscoe has refined a unique technique for creating her paintings, working sand acrylic and pigment across the canvas to create layering and textures reminiscent of the rock faces that inspire her. As Joanna Mendelssohn states: “The best way of describing these paintings is to say that they were born old — their toughness, monumentality and their rugged surface give the impression that in these works Briscoe has captured the ultimate essence of an ancient land.”